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Author Topic: Dakar 2018  (Read 1861 times)

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Re: Dakar 2018
« Reply #40 on: October 08, 2017, 07:50:36 AM »
From HRC:

Morocco Rally’s second special stage – originally scheduled for 364.5 kilometres – was cut short due to an unexpected rise in the level of some of the rivers. The times at the first check point will dictate the day’s stage results.

In spite of the fact that certain modifications to the roadbook had already been announced yesterday in Erfoud, heavy rains saw some of the rivers near to CP2 affected more than had been expected. Race authorities made the decision to stop the race at CP1. Ricky Brabec was the best finisher of the Monster Energy Honda Team riders, while Paulo Gonçalves and Kevin Benavides posted tenth and eleventh positions in the results at CP1.

Tomorrow’s third stage will be the first part of the two-day marathon stage from Erfoud to Erg Lihoudi, with 254.75 kilometres in the first special stage and 142.79 km in the second after a 180.36 km liaison section. The course will involve overcoming some rivers – oueds in local parlance – which could be either water-filled or mud-drenched, plus there will be some sand dunes and open plains where the bikes will really get a chance to let rip. However there will be a fair share of navigation to complicate proceedings. Once in Erg Lihoudi, riders are not allowed to receive external mechanical assistance and in the case of any mechanical issues, the competitors themselves will have to carry out any repairs.

Top 5 after day 2.

van Beveren
Metge
Sainz
Meo
Pedrero
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Re: Dakar 2018
« Reply #41 on: October 08, 2017, 11:00:16 AM »
Photos from Sam Sunderland's Facebook feed. A bit damp it seems




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Re: Dakar 2018
« Reply #42 on: October 09, 2017, 06:06:51 AM »
The first leg of the Morocco Rally marathon stage brought mixed feelings for the Monster Energy Honda Team. On one hand, it was a great success for Ricky Brabec, scooping his first stage victory in a world championship event, while Paulo Gonçalves fought a losing battle against an unbearable pain, following yesterday’s right hand injury.

American Ricky Brabec proved to be the fastest as the Morocco Rally arrived at its third stage – the first leg of the two-day marathon stage – which took place from Erfoud and the Lihoudi Erg region. Brabec was looking particularly comfortable astride the Honda CRF450 RALLY, hurtling through the special stage at a cracking pace. The timed section had been reduced to 142.79 kilometres due to the high level of water in the rivers. This marks Brabec’s first triumph in the FIM Cross-Country Rallies World Championship, adding to the seventh stage victory in the most recent Dakar Rally.

Paulo Gonçalves’ fortunes were the opposite. The Portuguese rider fell heavily yesterday damaging his right hand. After battling his way through today’s stage with considerable pain, both the rider himself and the team have deemed it appropriate to retire the rider from the event. In doing so, Paulo will be able to fully recover the hand before the season’s main objective: the Dakar Rally.

Meanwhile, Argentinean rider Kevin Benavides finished the stage in fifth position, a mere three minutes adrift of Monster Energy Honda Team buddy Ricky Brabec. Benavides lies in second overall position in the general rankings, less than ten minutes behind the leader. Brabec is third.

The penultimate stage of the rally takes place tomorrow, Monday, with the second leg of the marathon stage, which will take the riders back to Erfoud. The stage will feature a total of 170.86 kilometres of special, as the scheduled second part has been cancelled.

Stage standings:

Brabec
Walkner
Quintanilla
van Beveren
Benavides
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Re: Dakar 2018
« Reply #43 on: October 09, 2017, 06:22:29 AM »
From Vincent Crosbie's Facebook feed:

Last night I had the honor of attending the 37th Botswana National Sports Commission Awards in Gaborone.
Fortunately I was awarded the BNSC Chairman’s Award presented by Mr Solly Reikeletseng - I am honored and proud of the achievement and recognition I received in completing Dakar Rally 2017.
Thank you BNSC for recognizing Motorsport within your awards and I am sure this is the start of many awards to come for Motorsport in Botswana.
This wouldn’t have been possible without my loyal family, friends, supporters and most of all Sponsors. You all had the faith in me and I couldn’t thank you all enough








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Re: Dakar 2018
« Reply #44 on: October 10, 2017, 11:04:43 AM »
FLOODS AND CONTROVERSY ON THE RALLY OF MOROCCO

The 2017 OiLibya Rally of Morocco has just one more day to run – the short final stage around the city of Erfoud will decide the overall winner of the rally.

It hasn’t been so simple up until now however. After heavier than average rainfall leading up to the event, the rivers that the route crosses have proved to be impassable in a number of places.

On stage two, it was the leaders on the route, Husqvarna’s Pablo Quintanilla, and KTM’s Matthias Walkner and Sam Sunderland who were first to tackle one of the swollen oueds.

The riders were completely blind whilst attempting to cross, the water ran very muddy and it was near impossible to judge the depth in places.

Quintanilla and Sunderland came out the worst, both drowning their bikes and filling the engines with water. Quintanilla was able to carry on to the next checkpoint, where the stage was eventually neutralised.

Sunderland was not so lucky. With his fuel contaminated with murky water the 2017 Dakar winner was forced to retire.

“I’m really disappointed today," told Sunderland after Stage two. “Up to around 45km everything was great, the bike felt good and I was making good time. We got to the river and I followed the road book to the crossing, but although I took it as carefully as I could the bike just disappeared from beneath me. I ended up drowning the engine and getting water in the fuel.”


Later riders arriving at the first river were able to judge the water more accurately due to the help of the leaders. However, a river after CP1 was found to be completely impossible to cross for the bikes and the stage was stopped.

Days three and four made up the marathon stages of the event. Riders travelled to the desert camp of Erg Lihoudi where they would camp for the night and receive not assistance from their teams.

Again, due to the higher-than-normal level of the rivers, these stages were changed slightly to ensure the entire course was passable.

With one day left of the rally, it is championship leader Pablo Quintanilla that leads the overall standings. The Chilean rider just needs a good result on the final day to take the win of the rally and the 2017 FIM Cross-Country Rallies Championship.

It hasn’t been without controversy however, initially penalised with an additional 20 minutes due to missing a checkpoint after that first river and losing time whilst fixing his bike, Quintanilla was running way down the order.

A protest by the team led the FIM to delete the penalty and knock off his time lost due to mistakes in the road book for that day.




That decision by the organisers didn’t go down too well with Honda. Their riders were looking at podium positions and a possible championship for Kevin Benavides until the altered results.

“The stage was really fun but it’s hard to go racing when you know that KTM get their own way,” told Honda’s Ricky Brabec after stage four. “They have a really good spokesperson for FIM and towards the rally organisation. To keep racing after they get their own way every single day is tough for us. We keep fighting and we keep doing well and we can win. But when Honda wins KTM have something to say.

"It’s not good. It hasn’t been a good rally for us. They do something wrong they capitalize on it and get their time back. They miss a waypoint - they get their time back. They get stuck in the water - they get their time back. We go one kph over the speed limit - they give us a one-minute penalty. It’s a little BS for us.”

The fifth and final stage of the 2017 OiLibya Rally of Morocco will be held in the dunes surrounding Erfoud. The two-part special totals 188.15km with the complete stage measuring 232.06km. An undulating final 20km will require caution and good navigational skills before the riders reach the finish.

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Re: Dakar 2018
« Reply #45 on: November 24, 2017, 05:21:11 PM »
On a sad note, Alexander Nel passed away this week. Apparently the crop duster plane he was flying had a failure and he died in the ensuing accident. Alex had put his babies (Amgeza and West Coast Baja) on hold as he was aiming at a 2020 Dakar entry.

Huge loss to the entire biking fraternity.
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Re: Dakar 2018
« Reply #46 on: November 24, 2017, 05:21:58 PM »
Route for the 2018 Dakar has been announced.

It's going to be a doozy.
Even for us armchair racers

https://www.redbull.com/int-en/dakar-rally-2018-route-reveal
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Re: Dakar 2018
« Reply #47 on: November 24, 2017, 05:32:51 PM »
From the official Honda site:

The 40th edition of the Dakar is expected to make the history books
 

Paulo Gonçalves, second-place finisher for Honda in 2015, today took part in the official 2018 Dakar Rally presentation, as details of the race were revealed. The 40th edition looks set to be a hard-fought event in which the Monster Energy Honda Team will have their sights firmly set on a final victory.

One of the longest-awaited days for the Dakar community finally arrived yesterday. Until then, all that was know about the rally was what had been unveiled earlier in March with the announcement of the locations for the 2018 odyssey with its coveted bronze Tuareg statuette prize. This time it was the Pavilion d’Armenonville in the French capital that on Wednesday hosted the official presentation of the key details of the 40th edition of the Dakar – the mother of all rallies – the longest and toughest challenge for both riders and mechanics.

The event began with an ample summary of the race’s thirty-nine year history with some of the most poignant pictures, highlighting the courage of the riders over nearly four decades of offroad thrills and spills. Dakar Director Étienne Lavigne spoke about the epic South American adventure: ‘It is likely to be exceptional. Peru will again feature, like it did in 2012 and 2013. Bolivia will host the race for the fifth time too and Argentina will also be present as it has done every year since 2009′.

There remains only a month and a half before the busy streets of Lima begin to reverberate to the howl of the Dakar engines on January 6, 2018. The capital of Peru returns to the competition after a four-year hiatus. With just forty five days to showtime the Monster Energy Honda Team are primed and poised to get their Honda CRF450 RALLY on the road for the mammoth 9000 kilometre trek that leads to the final finish line in Córdoba, Argentina. En route competitors will be faced with thirteen gruelling days of racing. By the time the entourage arrives at the halfway stage for the rest day in La Paz, the capital of Bolivia, riders will barely have time to catch their breath or prepare for the final intense week which is expected to be one of the toughest rallies in the ten years that the event has been held in South America.

‘The Dakar has been the race of my life,’ was how Sporting Director Marc Coma described the Dakar Rally at the presentation. ‘It will be a dream ride to celebrate the four decades of this extraordinary race. It will be a magic edition where the riders will be able to battle through the dunes and get lost in Peru. Once again we will be able to surrender to the adoration of Bolivia, before we end up back at South America’s motorsport capital Cordoba, where there will be a big party to celebrate ten years of the Dakar in South America. We have juggled around the stages, for example, with the second stage, where the bikes will start after the cars. Also, stage four will have a motocross-style start and the alternating fifth stage will be where the riders will get to see the Tanaca dunes for the first time. In Bolivia, after the rest day in the capital La Paz, the first of the two marathon stages for motorcycles takes place. One of the longest stages will be Stage 8 from Uyuni-Tupiza. The entrance to Argentina will begin to mark out the clear favourites to win the race,’ stated Coma, ‘The altitude will be left behind and the sand will welcome us. Navigation will be a key factor and the starting order for the Fiambalá Super Special may also be crucial before reaching the final part of the Dakar, which will end in Cordoba with a final special loop in the mountain range, crossing numerous rivers’.

Lavigne also went over some of the data of this edition, which will feature about 337 vehicles, including 190 motorcycles. The Monster Energy Honda Team will participate with Joan Barreda (# 5), Paulo Gonçalves (# 6), Michael Metge (# 14), Ricky Brabec (# 20) and Kevin Benavides (# 47) and will be hoping to live up to their role as one of the Dakar 2018’s favourites with a corresponding place on the final podium in Córdoba.

DAY   STAGE   CONTRY   Km SS   Km Total
6/1   Lima-Pisco   Perú   31   272
7/1   Pisco-Pisco   Perú   267   278
8/1   Pisco-San Juan de Marcona   Perú   295   501
9/1   S. Juan de Marcona-S. Juan de Marcona   Perú   330   444
10/1   San Juan de Marcona-Arequipa   Perú   264   770
11/1   Arequipa-La Paz   Perú/Bolivia   313   758
12/1   Rest day in La Paz   Bolivia   –   –
13/1   La Paz-Uyuni   Bolivia   425   726
14/1   Uyuni-Tupiza   Bolivia   498   584
15/1   Tupiza-Salta   Bolivia/Argentina   242   754
16/1   Salta-Belén   Argentina   372   795
17/1   Belén-Chilecito   Argentina   280   484
18/1   Chilecito-San Juan   Argentina   375   722
19/1   San Juan-Córdoba   Argentina   423   904
20/1   Córdoba-Córdoba   Argentina   119   284
Total   4234   8276
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Re: Dakar 2018
« Reply #48 on: November 25, 2017, 10:15:35 AM »
Scrutineering was or is happening this week end in Le Harvre.

Here are some photos I took off Lindyn Poskitt's Facebook page. I hope the SA competitors have made it? I have looked around but not seen any updates.




































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Re: Dakar 2018
« Reply #49 on: November 25, 2017, 10:24:41 AM »
OK, so Donovan van Langeberg is there. here are some photos from the Dakar 2018 Southern African Facebook page:

















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