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Author Topic: What I've learnt post heart attack  (Read 165 times)

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Offline adventurer

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What I've learnt post heart attack
« on: October 08, 2017, 06:54:22 PM »
Posting this here, because it's relevant to all bikers....
There are a few priorities, in no specific order, 1, HAVE A DREAD DISEASE POLICY, one that will pay out post heart attack, and take one out while you are still healthy, once you have some relevantly bad condition, nobody wants to talk to you, and you can't amend what you have post diagnosis, not even if the amendment has nothing to do with what you have...
2, UNDERSTAND the policy you take out, NEVER buy a policy from someone that works for the institution you are taking the policy through, these policies are structured TOTALLY in favour of the policy institution, you literally have to be at death's door before it gets paid in full....unless it was sold to you, and structured by someone that cares about YOUR well-being, I have learnt this from experience.
3, a heart attack WILL SLOW YOU DOWN, trust me, you will not ride bikes for some time, the heart may be repaired, but the meds you HAVE to take post HA (Heart Attack) unbalance you, making biking dangerous. You might not be able to work for quite a while, a dread disease policy, the correct type, will see you through, if you are a company employee, you only have so much sick leave, you WILL need more than you have, unless you have a very understanding boss, which few have, you can get into extremely stressful dept situations, and stress is something you need to avoid.
4, your cardiologist/ his secretary WILL stuff you around when you need the paperwork/reports to submit to your insurer, although they know full well you've just had a massive heart attack, they don't care, it's almost as if they're farming for more business, they will take their sweet time, they don't care what type of financial situation you are in......they will tell you 3 days, trust me, 4 weeks is more like it, if you're lucky, and often you will not get told about the price of that report until you are asked to collect it, and it's not cheap, cost me R2k, cardiologists are not cheap.....
5, MEDICAL AID......if you don't have one, GET ONE, without one you are at the mercy of a government hospital, luckily I have a medical aid, a very good one, buy the best you can afford...
NEVER think it will never happen to you....I was fit, don't smoke or drink, am not over-weight, I eat well, it still happened, my only advantage was all of those factors helped save my life, I'm told it was stress, months and years worth, NOBODY is immune.....I had an ECG a month before the HA, was told my heart is 100%....
6, you WILL learn who your true friends/family are, you will find out who cares about you, and who is too busy with other stuff to ask how you are doing, you may be pleasantly surprised/disappointed, but don't get stressed, just move on, it's life, the world doesn't stop and wait for you to get back on.....
7, you will feel as if you have a sign on your forehead that says 'I've had a heart attack, please help me have another one'....although in part that your temper will be a LOT shorter, it seems that people act on another level of stupid, are suddenly incompetent on a new level, like it's a challenge to see how quickly you can have another heart attack.........I'm told therapy is highly recommended, if you can afford it or your medical aid covers it, do it.........a good friend of mine who had a HA 6 weeks before me has had therapy, says it made a big difference.....you kind of have PTSD, having a HA is a massive shock mentally, it should be addressed...
8, bikes ARE therapeutic.....once I could ride again, I felt much better straight away, although the first ride was pretty daunting, the KTM 1290 R is not for the 'feint hearted', but I felt alive and just thankful that I could still ride, but don't rush it, that bike will always be there, it does not get sad because it's not being ridden, the battery might go flat, but that's a minor.....
9, lastly,  when you are physically and financially able, go for a LOOOOONG ride..... :ricky: :cool:

Offline Geotraveller

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Re: What I've learnt post heart attack
« Reply #1 on: October 08, 2017, 07:09:12 PM »
Thanks for posting Kurt. Food for thought indeed.
"No bike does everything perfectly. In fact, no bike does anything until someone gets on it to ride"

Online Dual

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Re: What I've learnt post heart attack
« Reply #2 on: October 08, 2017, 07:35:18 PM »
Sjoe, eye opener, I have celiac disease (gluten intolerance) doesn't seem serious, though it made me anemic, I passed out on the job without knowing it, my iron levels dropped to 5.8, should be between 14 and 16
I felt healthy until the passing out happened
It slowed me down, also did not ride my bike for two months or so, too scared I pass out while riding
Mentally it got to me
I'm not trying to hijack your thread, just contribute
We must look out for ourselves and each other
It comes like a thief in the dark

Glad you are OK'ish, hope all work out well for the future and it does not happen again  :thumbsup:

Offline adventurer

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Re: What I've learnt post heart attack
« Reply #3 on: October 09, 2017, 07:52:19 AM »
Sjoe, eye opener, I have celiac disease (gluten intolerance) doesn't seem serious, though it made me anemic, I passed out on the job without knowing it, my iron levels dropped to 5.8, should be between 14 and 16
I felt healthy until the passing out happened
It slowed me down, also did not ride my bike for two months or so, too scared I pass out while riding
Mentally it got to me
I'm not trying to hijack your thread, just contribute
We must look out for ourselves and each other
It comes like a thief in the dark

Glad you are OK'ish, hope all work out well for the future and it does not happen again  :thumbsup:

By all means, the importance of this is to learn from each other's experiences, most of the time we only learn the hard way, which I have, if it can help other people from falling into the same traps, we need to share these things.

Offline Geotraveller

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Re: What I've learnt post heart attack
« Reply #4 on: October 09, 2017, 10:50:03 AM »
The thing is genetics can play a big part. Daniel Conradie dropped dead in front of a dozen of us on King's Beach before a East Cape Surf lifesaving competition. He had just come off his ski after a warm up paddle, walked up the beach, said howizt to a bunch of us and bam.

30 years old, in his prime as a paddler. In he top ten in SA. Lived right and carried not an ounce of fat.

May us sit up and think.
"No bike does everything perfectly. In fact, no bike does anything until someone gets on it to ride"

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